Depictions of Spanish Conquest in Codex Aubin and Codex Mexicanus

The similarities in depictions of the Spanish in the Codex Aubin and Codex Mexicanus with the imagery in the Florentine Codex shows the continuity of perspective in the codices created by the Aztecs. The Codex Aubin, a pictorial Codex detailing Aztec history, dedicates an entire page of illustration to an armored Spaniard standing in front of a great Aztec temple, menacingly wielding a spear at the natives. The opposite page shows a sailing ship next to the year of arrival. The Codex Mexicanus, an extensive timeline written on a very long piece of amate paper detailing Aztec history from their mythical founding in the land of Aztlan, to the arrival of the Spanish and colonial rule, offers yet another example of shared imagery throughout Aztec codices. The Spanish are once again represented with an armored Conquistador wielding a spear and a depiction of a Spanish ship. Later on, it depicts a Spaniard sitting on a throne with a native ally at his side, speaking to a subjugated Aztec. Later on we see the arrival of Christianity to Mexico, with depictions of items such as a crown adorned with a cross and a papal globe

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Diego Duran

Codice Aubin, 1576

Ink on Paper

Department of Ceramics and Ethnography, British Museum, London, England

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Codex Mexicanus, 1590

Ink on Amate Sheets

Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

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Codex Mexicanus, 1590

Ink on Amate Sheets

Bibliotheque National, Paris, France

Other Aztec Codices
Depictions of Spanish Conquest in Codex Aubin and Codex Mexicanus